HomeDiamond Cuts

Cut Related Terms

Porportion - The best cut diamonds reflect light back to the eye evenly in the face-up position. Here no dark areas are visible.

Dark or 'dead' areas are due to poor cutting. When a diamond is well-cut (either a fine cut or an Ideal cut), light enters through the table and travels all the way to the pavilion where it reflects from one side of the diamond to the other - intensifying in the mirror-like facets as it travels - before reflecting back out of the diamond through the table and into the observer's eye. This brightness that should come from the very heart of a diamond is known as brilliance.

 



Brilliance - is what differentiates the diamonds ability to reflect light from those lesser abilities found in other gemstones.

Finish - Finish is the quality imparted to a diamond by the direct skill of the diamond cutter. The term "finish" entails every aspect of a diamond's appearance that is not a result of the diamond's naturual existence when it is recovered from the ground. The diamond's design, the precision of its cutting details, and the quality of its polish are all a consideration when a gemologist is grading finish. If you examine a diamond's grading report, you will see its finish graded according to two separate categories: polish and symmetry.

Polish - is defined as any blemish on the surface of the diamond not significant enough to affect clarity.

Symmetry - is defined as the variations in a diamond's symmetry. Small variations can include misalignment of facets or facets that fail to point correctly to the girdle (this misalignment is completely undetectable to the naked eye). Symmetry problems are indicative of diamonds graded as fair or poor.

Table - is defined as the largest and top-most facet on the diamond's crown. The table percentage is the value which represents how the diameter of the table facet compares to the diameter of the entire diamond. So, for example if a diamond with a 53% table has a table which is 53% as wide as the diamond's outline. For a round diamond, gemologists calculate table percentage by dividing the diameter of the table, which is measured in millimeters (this millimeter measurement does not appear on diamond grading reports) by the average girdle diameter (an average of the first two millimeter measurements on the top left-hand side of a diamond grading report). For a fancy shape diamond, table percentage is calculated by dividing the width of the table, at the widest part of the diamond, by the millimeter width of the entire stone (this total width measurement is the second of the three millimeter values in the top left-hand corner of the diamond grading report. The Table measurements are subtlties which vary ever so slightly and should not become a pre-occupation is diamond selection.

Scintillation - is defined as the ability to reflect and return white light to the eye. Creating those quick flashes of light you see as a person tilts the diamond back and forth during normal movement.

Dispersion - is defined as the facets, and the angles at which a diamond is cut. The way they have been skillfully designed to break up white light as it hits the surface, separating it into its component spectral colors-red, blue, green etc. This effect, which appears as a play of small flashes of color across the surface of the diamond as it is tilted, is also called "fire".

The crown - For a round diamond, in order for the crown to provide sufficient fire, the bezel facets should be cut within a specific range of angles (usually between 33 and 35 degrees). However, this range is merely a guideline, not a hard-and-fast rule that must be adhered to in every case. At the outer points of this range, you might find diamonds with crown angles of as little as 31.5 degrees and as much as 35.9 degrees which are still very attractive. These angles do not affect the diamond's table percentage in any way. It is possible for a diamond's crown to have any combination of crown angles and table size that a cutter desires.

Crown Diagram of Diamond

The pavilion - is the part of the diamond that lays just below the girdle. It is easy to see why people often neglect to consider it's contribution to a diamond's beauty; when a diamond is set, typically only the crown stands out prominently, and the girdle and pavilion are hidden beneath prongs or bezels. They seem to serve only as the utilitarian purpose of providing a way to hold the diamond in place. However, it is this hidden part of the diamond that is the key to brilliance. The secret is in the pavilion angles, which, in a round diamond, should typically be between 40.5 and 41.5 degrees. Bow Ties are directly related with fancy accounts. They are light reflected back to the eye from the pavilion. It differs from point to point within any given diamond. This effect is manifested in the form of tiny patterns, known as bow ties, in the diamond's center. They look like a man's bow tie. They are a very important part of the fancy cut. They are directly responsible for the diamonds brilliance. The difference is that most fancy shapes require deeper pavilions than round diamonds do in order to achieve the same amount of brilliance.

Pavilion Diagram of Diamond

16.9.1 Brief history of the development of cutting
16.9.2 The cuts
16.9.3 New cuts
16.9.4 Quality of cut and ideal proportions for diamond, How cut affects light return, beauty and value
16.9.5 Proportion measurement
16.9.6 Famous Diamonds
Every now and then under the earths hot surfaces, whether through an eruption or excavation some lucky excavator finds his way to becoming a renowned explorer.

Soon their discovery will pack the museum floors with great audiences from around the world to see yet another wonderfully polished diamond in it's highest carat form mother nature created millions of years ago, with the wonderfully master cut and polishing of Gabi Tolkowsky to which no ones surprise will become another monumental and famous diamond.

Very rarely do diamonds of these great sizes reveal themselves to the surface of the earth. When they do, their beauty and majesty hypnotically entertain even those commissioned to polish them. Some of these famous diamonds are incredibly large, after being cut and polished they achieve sizes of two hundred plus carats with the greatest possible fire or brilliance any master cutter can possibly achieve.

Hope Diamond

More notorious than any other diamond. The Hope was once owned by Louis XIV and was officially designated the ‘blue diamond of the crown.’ Stolen during the French Revolution, it turned up in London in 1830 and was bought by Henry Philip Hope after whom it is currently named. At that time it acquired its gruesome reputation for bad luck: all the Hope family died in poverty. A similar misfortune befell a later owner, Edward McLean. You can see the Blue Hope today at the Smithsonian in Washington.

The Blue Hope Diamond
Weight: 45.52 carats

The Cullinan Diamond

This 3,106 carat diamond is the largest gem diamond ever found. It was discovered in 1905 at the Premier mines in South Africa by Frederick Wells, a mine superintendent. He was walking through the mine at the end of the day, when he happened to glance up. He noticed a large mass in one side of the mine wall. Thinking it was a big piece of glass embedded by a practical joker he examined what turned out to be a huge diamond. Wells received $10,000 for his find. The diamond was named Cullinan, after the mine's owner Sir Thomas Cullinan.

THE CULLINAN DIAMOND
Weight: 3,106 carat (rough)
Cut: Final cut Pear shaped diamond

It was purchased for $800,000 as a present for King Edward VII for his 66th birthday. The stone was sent to the Asscher Brothers in Amsterdam to be cut. They had successfully cut the Excelsior, previously the largest diamond. The huge uncut stone was studied for months. Then on February 10, 1908, Mr. Asscher stuck the steel cleaver's blade to make the first cut. The blade broke while the diamond remained intact.

On the second attempt, it split exactly as planned. It was reported that after the second cut, Mr. Asscher fainted. Further cuts produced three principal parts, and these in tern were cut into 9 major gems, 96 smaller brilliants, and 9.5 carats of unpolished pieces.The Cullinan I was the largest gem produced from the rough stone. It is a pear shaped stone of 530.2 carats and is the world's largest cut diamond.

The Cullinan I is now in the head of the royal scepter in the British crown jewels. The second largest cut diamond, the Cullinan II, is a cushion-shaped stone weighing 317.4 carats, and is set in the British imperial state crown. 

The Kohinoor Diamond

According to some sources, the Koh-i-noor diamond was found in the Godavari river in central India 4,000 years ago. Tradition associated with it states that its owner will rule the world, but that to possess it is dangerous for any but a woman. This may have been a delicate piece of flattery to Queen Victoria, who once owned the gem.
The authentic history of this jewel begins in the 14 c. when it was reported to be in the possession of the rajas of Malwa. It later fell into the hands of Baber, who founded the Mogul dynasty in 1526. During the next two centuries the diamond was one of the most prized items in the treasure of the Mogul emperors.
In 1939, Nadir Shah of Persia invaded India and all of the treasures of the Moguls fell into his hands except the great diamond. Nadir Shah was told by one of the emperor's harem women that the stone was hidden in the emperor's turban. The conqueror then invited the conquered to a feast and offered to exchange turbans as a gesture of friendship. The emperor had no choice but to agree. Later, in the privacy of his tent, Nadir Shah unrolled the turban, the gem fell out, and Nadir is supposed to have exclaimed "Koh-i-noor", mountain of light.

The stone continued in the possession of the Persian dynasty, although many attempts were made to gain ownership of it. The Persian king was assassinated, and his son Shah Rukh, was deposed. In an effort to discover the whereabouts of the diamond Shah Rukh´s eyes were put out, and boiling pitch was poured on his head, but he refused steadfastly to reveal its hiding place. Later, a Persian king fled with it to the Sikh court, and Ranjit Singh, the Lion of the Punjab, took the stone and wore it as a decoration. It was later placed in the Lahore treasury. After the Sikh wars, it was taken by the East India Company as part of the indemnity levied in 1849, and was subsequently presented to Queen Victoria at a sparkling levee marking the company's 250th anniversary.

Koh Diamond
Weight: 108.93 carats
Cut: round brilliant cut diamond

The jewel was displayed at the Great Exhibition of 1851 where it was thought to display insufficient fire. It was decided to recut it from its original Indian form, and a member of the Amsterdam firm of Costar was called to London to cut the stone. A steam-driven cutting wheel was set up, and Prince Albert se the stone on the wheel, while the Duke of Wellington started it. The cutting took 38 days, but did not add much to the stone's brilliance. It was rather believed that the historical value of the diamond was diminished by the cutting. Queen Victoria continued to wear it as an ornament, then left it to Queen Alexandra, who wore it at Edward VII´s coronation. In 1911, the jewel was used in a crown made for Queen Mary, and in 1937, in another made to be worn by Queen Elizabeth at the coronation of her husband, King George VI in 1937. The Queen Mother's crown with the Koh-i-noor is in the Tower of London.

Star Of Africa Diamond

One of the most famous diamonds is the Great Star of Africa, weighing 530.2 carats, which was cut from the world's largest rough diamond, the Cullinan I. The historic Cullinan diamond, found in South Africa in 1905, weighed an astounding 3,106.75 carats. It was cut into the Great Star of Africa (Cullinan I), the Lesser Star of Africa (known as the Cullinan II, weighing 317.40 carats), and 103 other diamonds of nearly flawless clarity. The principal diamonds are mounted in the British crown jewels.

Star Of Africa Diamond - famous diamonds
Weight: 530.2 carat cut diamond

The Tiffany Diamond

The largest golden diamond known today is cut in a unique cushion shape. It was given 90 :facets, 32 more than the standard brilliant cut, and these extra facets give the great yellow diamond the effect of smoldering fire. You can see this fabulous stone at Tiffany’s in New York City.

THE TIFFANY DIAMOND
Weight: 128.51 carats

The Jubilee Diamond

Many gemologists believe the Jubilee is the most perfectly cut of all large diamonds. Its facets are so exact that it can be balanced on the culet point, which is less than two millimeters across. You can see this majestic diamond today at the DeBeers Diamond Pavillion in Johannesberg.

most perfect cut diamond The Jubilee Diamond
Weight: 245.33 carats

Diamond shapes

 

Round Brilliant Diamonds

Of these diamonds shapes, the most popular by far is the round diamond, which takes centre stage in the classic engagement ring – a round, solitaire diamond set either in yellow gold or platinum. Shapes other than round are called fancy shapes.

This shape has set the standard for all other diamond shapes, and accounts for more than 75% of diamonds sold today. Its 58-facet cut, divided among its crown (top), girdle (widest part) and pavilion (base), is calibrated through a precise formula to achieve the maximum in fire and brilliance. There are many different round brilliant diamond cuts from the Ideal cut diamond – which has 58 facets --- to the patented, 66-facet Leo Diamond cut.

 

 Oval diamonds

Oval diamonds are an even, perfectly symmetrical design popular among women with small hands or short fingers. Oval diamonds have an elongated shape which can make a woman's finger appear longer.

The oval diamond has beautiful brilliance that is similar to a round diamond.

The history of the brilliant-cut oval diamond is relatively easy to track because it is a relatively young shape. Created by Lazare Kaplan in the late 1950s -early 1960s, the oval brilliant cut is an elipitical variation of the more common round brilliant.

The modern oval cut is a fiery diamond that reflects light brilliantly.

Choosing an Oval Diamond

When purchasing an Oval Diamond, it is important to select both the highest grade cut and colour within budget.

Our minimum recommendations for buying Oval Diamonds are as follows (please remember these recommendations are opinion only, and your tastes may vary):

  • Cut: Good
  • colour: G
  • Clarity: VS2
  • Depth Percentage: 58-66%
  • Table: 51-64%

Because an oval can be "short and fat" or "long and thin", always be sure to check the length and width of the diamond prior to purchasing. For the most traditional length-width ratio of oval diamonds, look for ratios between 1.33 and 1.66. However, some people prefer longer, thinner cuts, and some prefer rounder, softer cuts.

Like the pear shaped diamond the oval cut can fall victim to the "bow-tie effect" - an undesirable dark area near the center of the diamond. It is not unusual to see "some" bow-tie if you examine an oval-shaped diamond from various angles and in different lights, but what you don't want is an obvious black/dark spot that is dull from every angle and in all lights. If you're "wondering" if the diamond you purchased is suffering from the bow-tie effect, it probably isn't. It's one of those defects, that when present, is obvious.

Marquise diamonds

Marquise diamonds have an elongated shape with pointed ends supposedly inspired by the smile of the Marquise de Pompadour and commissioned by the Sun King, France's Louis XIV. It is often used as a solitaire or enhanced by smaller diamonds.

The marquise is essentially a pointed oval shaped diamond. Marquise-shaped diamonds are really unique. They have been popular for centuries, are therefore are often used in antique diamond engagement rings.  Often, marquise-shaped diamond come in fancy colours such as fancy yellow and fancy brown.

Choosing a Marquise Diamond

The ideal length-to-width ratio range for a marquise diamond engagement ring is 1.75 to 2.25. Some prefer a more rounded look, opting for a length-width-ratio of 1.5.

 

Pear shaped diamonds

Pear shaped diamonds are a hybrid cut, combining the best of the oval and the marquise, shaped like a teardrop. Pear shaped diamonds also complements a hand with small or average-length fingers. It works exceptionally well in pendants or earrings.

The Pear shaped diamond is a fiery cut with lots of wonderful sparkle and flash. The elegant lines of the Pear Shaped Diamond lends a sophisticated air to both the simplest and most elaborate ring settings.

Choosing a Pear Shaped Diamond

When purchasing a Pear Shaped Diamond, it's extremely important to pay attention to quality and to select the highest grade cut you can afford. Pear-shaped diamonds are prone to two cutting issues: the bow-tie effect and "high" or "uneven" shoulders.


The image to the left is a simulation of the bow-tie effect. It's not unusual to see "some" bow-tie if you examine a pear-shaped diamond from various angles and in different lights, but what you don't want is an obvious black/dark spot that is dull from every angle and in all lights. If you're "wondering" if the diamond you purchased is suffering from the bow-tie effect, it probably isn't. It's one of those defects, that, when present is obvious.

 

 


The picture to the left is a simulation of "uneven shoulders". The non-pointed end of the pear shaped diamond should have a nice round and gentle arc. In addition to "uneven shoulders", sometimes cutters, to increase the carat weight of the diamond "square off" or give a "rounded triangle" end to the pear-shaped diamond. High-shoulders and uneven shoulders decrease the value of the diamond and should be avoided.

The "good news" is that both of these potential problems are visible to the naked eye.

minimum recommendations for buying Pear Shaped Diamonds are as follows:

  • Cut: Good
  • Color: G
  • Clarity: VS2
  • Depth Percentage: 56-70%
  • Table: 53-62%
  • Length/Width Ratio: 1.70:1 - 1.45:1

Always be sure to check the length and width of the diamond prior to purchasing. The traditionally accepted ratio for Pear Diamonds is 1.70:1 to 1.45:1, but some people prefer longer, thinner cuts, and some prefer the shorter, fatter cuts.

 

Radiant cut diamonds

Radiant cut diamonds have a square or rectangular cut that combines the elegance of the emerald cut diamond with the brilliance of the round. Radiant cut diamonds have 70 facets to maximize the effect of its colour refraction.

If you love the fire of the traditional Round Brilliant Cut (the standard diamond engagement ring cut) and the shape of the less fiery Emerald Cut and Asscher Cut, you just may love the Radiant Cut Diamond.

Most square or rectangular cuts just don't live up to the round brilliant for sparkle, but the Radiant Cut was designed for getting maximum brilliance. Like the emerald cut, the radiant cut diamond is often a rectangle (sometimes square) with cropped corners, but that's where the similarities end. Where the emerald cut has long trim lines, the radiant cut is faceted for fire.

Choosing a Radiant Cut Diamond

When purchasing a radiant cut diamond online, be sure to check width and length -- there are no "rules" for length/width ratios for the radiant cut and you must review these numbers to determine if the stone is rectangular or closer to square.

The radiant cut diamond is more forgiving of diamond flaws and weaknesses than the less sparkling Emerald Cut diamond or the Asscher Cut diamond.

Our minimum recommendations for buying radiant cut diamonds are as follows:

  • Cut: Very Good
  • Color: G
  • Clarity: VS2
  • Depth Percentage: 58-69%
  • Table: 58-69%

 

Heart shaped diamonds

Heart shaped diamonds are basically a pear-shaped diamond with a cleft at the top. Heart shaped diamonds are sometimes considered romantic, but they can be difficult to cut. The skill of the cutter greatly determines the beauty of heart shaped diamonds.

Choosing a Heart Shaped Diamond

The heart-shaped diamond is likely the most difficult diamond shape to purchase online. If you find a heart shaped diamond you'd like to buy online, we strongly recommend you:

  1. Review the length to width ratio to determine the heart's proportions (short and fat? elongated? evenly proportion?)
  2. Ensure that the seller has an excellent return policy -- if the diamond arrives and you don't care for the cleft, you want to be able to either exchange or return the stone.

When purchasing a heart-shaped diamond, it's extremely important to pay attention to quality and to select the highest grade cut affordable. While "shape" is not the same as "cut", the skill of the cutter is critical with heart-shaped diamonds and a diamond with a high grade cut, likely had a skilled cutter.

Our minimum recommendations for buying heart-shaped diamonds are as follows (please remember these recommendations are opinion only, and your tastes may vary):

  • Cut: Good
  • Color: G
  • Clarity: VS2

Always be sure to check the length and width of the diamond prior to purchasing.

 

Trillion/Trilliant cut diamonds

The trillion cut was developed in the late seventies. The trillion cut is an adaptation of the radiant cut but it is in a triangular shape. The trillion is a triangle that has equilateral sides and is a combination cut of the step cut and the brilliant cut diamond.

This is a spectacular wedge of brittle fire. First developed in Amsterdam, the exact design can vary depending on a particular diamond's natural characteristics and the cutter's personal preferences. It may be a traditional triangular shape with pointed corners or a more rounded triangular shape with 25 facets on the crown, 19 facets on the pavilion, and a polished girdle. It is definitely for the adventurous.

Asscher cut diamonds

Asscher cut diamonds were developed in 1902 by the Asscher Brothers of Holland. The Asscher cut is a stepped square cut, often called the "square emerald cut" and like an emerlad cut, the Asscher cut has cropped corners. Asscher cut diamonds have gained in popularity recently.

The "Asscher cut diamond" was developed in 1902 by the Asscher Brothers of Holland. It is a stepped square cut, often called the "square emerald cut" and like an emerald cut, the Asscher has cropped corners.

Until recently, very few stores carried Asscher cut diamonds. But the Asscher cut has rapidly gained popularity as it was featured on the television show "Sex & and the City" and stars such as Kate Hudson have received Asscher-cuts as engagement rings. Due to the increased popularity, more and more stores are carrying this fashionable cut -- however, the range of diamonds tends to be smaller than for other more common cuts.

 

Choosing an Asscher Cut Diamond

The Asscher cut is designed to draw the eye into the diamond and as such, you should always select the highest quality stone you can afford.

Our minimum recommendations for buying Asscher cut diamonds are as follows (please remember these recommendations are opinion only, and your tastes may vary):

  • Cut: Good
  • Color: G
  • Clarity: SI2
  • Depth Percentage: 64-72%
  • Table: 54-63%

Princess cut diamonds

Princess cut diamonds are perhaps the most popular of the fancy shaped diamonds. Princess cut diamonds are relatively new with a shape that is oblong, usually square or almost square, but with a modified brilliant cut arrangement of facets instead of a step cut. Most square or rectangular cuts just don't live up to the round brilliant for sparkle, but princess cut diamonds are designed for getting maximum brilliance from a square cut.

Most square or rectangular cuts just don't live up to the round brilliant for sparkle, but the Princess Cut was designed for getting maximum brilliance from a square cut.

Always ensure that the setting for your princess cut diamond protects the four pointed corners -- these are the points most likely to chip (and why most rectangular or square diamond cuts have cropped corners).

Choosing a Princess Cut Diamond

The princess cut diamond is more forgiving of diamond flaws and weaknesses than the less sparkling Emerald Cut Diamond or the Asscher Cut Diamond, so we provided two sets of "minimums" -- one giving more weight to quality and one giving more weight to budget.

Our minimum recommendations for buying princess cut diamonds are as follows (please remember these recommendations are opinion only, and your tastes may vary):

  • Cut: Very Good
  • Color: G
  • Clarity: VS2
  • Depth Percentage: 58-77%
  • Table: 58-77%

Now if you're on a tight budget, you can still find a nice stone going with these minimums:

  • Cut: Good
  • Color: I
  • Clarity: SI2
  • Depth Percentage: 56-84%
  • Table: 53-85%

Cushion cut diamond

The cushion cut diamond is an antique style of cut. Sometimes referred to as a "pillow cut", the cushion cut has an open culet (the bottom of the diamond) and a rectangular to square shape with rounded corners. The beauty of a cushion cut is the depth of the diamond. In the past most quality cushion cut diamonds were found only on the antique and estate market, today cutters are once again cutting these stones.

The cushion cut is an antique cut that most often resembles a cross between the Old Mine Cut (a deep cut with large facets that was common in the late 19th and the early 20th centuries) and a modern oval cut. This shape is also sometimes referred to as the pillow-cut or the candlelight diamond (a reference to cuts designed prior to electric lights, when diamonds sparkled in the light provided by candles).

This cut is not as fiery or brilliant as many of the newer cuts, but it has a marvelously romantic and classic look and definitely stands out from the crowd of round brilliants.

 

Choosing a Cushion Cut Diamond

Standards for cushion cut diamonds vary widely and more than with most contemporary cuts, much is left to personal taste. So you will easily find cushion cuts that are nearly square, long rectangles, and with varying size tables and depth percentages.

Because of the large open facets of the cushion cut, opt for the highest clarity and color your budget affords. If you're looking for a stone that most closely matches the original cushion cut, opt for a length/width ratio of 1.25 - 1.30.

Our minimum recommendations for buying cushion cut diamonds are as follows (please remember these recommendations are opinion only, and your tastes may vary):

  • Cut: Good
  • Color: G
  • Clarity: VS2

Now if you're on a tight budget, you can still find a nice stone going with these minimums:

  • Cut: Good
  • Color: I
  • Clarity: SI2

Emerald cut diamonds

Emerald cut diamonds have a rectangular shape with cut corners. It is known as a step cut because its broad, flat planes resemble steps on a staircase. Inclusions and inferior colour are more pronounced in emerald cut diamonds, so pay close attention to clarity and colour grading.

As may be evident by the name, the "emerald cut" was originally developed for cutting emeralds, not diamonds.

While the emerald gemstone is a relatively hard stone (7.5 - 8.0 on the MOHS scale), it is known for numerous inclusions (naturally occuring internal flaws). The inclusions make the stone vulnerable to breakage, making them difficult to cut. The stepped, normally rectangular cut with cropped corners (shown above), known as the "emerald cut" was developed to address these issues.

It was soon discovered that the emerald cut was also suitable for other stones, including diamonds.

The emerald cut diamond can be absolutely stunning. Because of it's long lines, it tends to be less fiery than a "round brilliant" cut, but it also tends to have broader, more dramatic flashes of light. The trim lines of emerald cut diamonds lend an elegant, sophisticated air to both the simplest and most elaborate ring settings.

Choosing an Emerald Cut Diamond

When purchasing an emerald cut diamond, it's extremely important to pay attention to quality and to select the highest grade stone you can afford. Because of the "openess" of the cut, flaws, color weakness, and a poor cut are more evident to the naked eye than a cut such as the round brilliant. The good news is, emerald cut diamonds are not as "traditional" as the round brilliant or as trendy as the princess cut -- making their pricing extremely economical when compared to the more common cuts.

Our minimum recommendations for buying emerald cut diamonds are as follows (please remember these recommendations are opinion only, and your tastes may vary):

  • Cut: Good
  • Color: G
  • Clarity: VS2
  • Depth Percentage: 58-69%
  • Table: 58-69%

Always be sure to check the length and width of the diamond prior to purchasing. The traditionally accepted ratio for emerald cut diamonds is 1.5:1 to 1.75:1, but some people prefer longer, thinner cuts, and some prefer the shorter, fatter cuts.

Round Shape Diamond
Round Shape Diamond
This is the most common diamond shape. Some will say that it accounts for almost 75% of all jewelry diamonds out there. The uniqueness of this shape is its cut. It is said to be a perfect way to cut a diamond to achieve maximum fire in brilliance. There are 58 Facets divided amongst its crown (top), girdle (wide part) and pavilion (base).
Oval Shape Diamond
Oval Shape Diamond
An Oval Diamond is almost as beautiful and as brilliant as Round Shaped Diamond. Its unique characteristic and a selling point is its ability to create a flattering illusion of length to the hand. Very popular shape amongst women with short fingers and smaller hands. When purchasing Oval Diamonds look out for "bow-tie effect" which is detectable by the naked eye in poorly cut Oval Diamonds.
Marquise Shape Diamond
Marquise Shape Diamond
Marquise Diamond shape maximizes the carat weight. It give an illusion of a much larger diamond than it really is. The length of the Marquise Diamond makes the fingers look longer and slender. The name comes from the fetching smile of the Marquise de Pompadour and commissioned by the Sun King, France's Louis XIV, who wanted a diamond to match it. When purchasing Marquise Diamonds look out for "bow-tie effect" which is detectable by the naked eye in poorly cut Marquise Diamonds.
Pear Shape Diamond
Pear Shape Diamond
Pear Shaped Diamonds are not commonly used in Rings. They are much more suitable for Pendants or for earrings due to the "Teardrop" effect. Pear Shaped Diamond cut is a combination of Round and Marquise cut. When purchasing a Pear Shaped Diamond look out for "bow-tie effect" which is detectable by a naked eye in poorly cut Pear Shaped diamonds.
Heart Shape Diamond
Heart Shape Diamond
Heart Shaped diamonds are very similar to Pear Shaped diamonds. In fact most of the time a well experienced cutter would choose to cut the diamond into a heart shaped due to some inclusions located in the clef.. Of course the Hear is the ultimate love symbol and therefore the diamond shaped into a heart has this appeal. Heart shaped diamonds may have "bow-tie effect" so watch out for that when purchasing heart Shaped diamond.
Emerald Shape Diamond
Emerald Shape Diamond
The name "emerald cut diamond" was originally developed for cutting emeralds not diamonds. This particular cut is also known as "Step cut" Emerald Shaped Diamond is unique because of its pavilion. The pavilion is cut with rectangular facets resulting in even better brilliance. The clarity of the diamond is very important in this particular shape as the shape of the diamond brings out the clarity. Emerald Cut Diamond will not have a "bow-tie effect". Remember if you choose Emerald Cut diamond you should go for a higher quality diamond because its shape will reveal the inclusions and clarity.
Princess Shape Diamond
Princess Shape Diamond
Princess Cut was introduced fairly recently. It was invented about 30 years ago by Basil Watermeyer from Johannesburg. Due to the fact that Princess Cut Diamond has extra faceting, and the effects it produces, princess cuts are naturally more brilliant and sparkly than ordinary square diamonds. Any inclusions are less visible, and any slight yellowish or brownish color is less noticeable, helping to create more attractive diamonds at more reasonable prices. Solitaire Engagement Rings with Princess Shaped Diamond are suitable for a hand with longer fingers.
Radiant Shape Diamond
Radiant Shape Diamond
Unique Characteristics of this Radiant Diamond Shape is its trimmed corners. This particular shape is very versatile. 70 facets maximize the effect of its color refraction. Due to its shape the color imperfections may be more visible on this diamond you must consider this when purchasing Radiant Shaped Diamond.
Trilliant Shape Diamond
Trilliant Shape Diamond
Trilliant Shape Diamond was first developed in Amsterdam. The design usually varies depending on a diamond's natural characteristics and the cutter's preferences. It may be a traditional triangular shape with pointed corners or a more rounded triangular shape with 25 facets on the crown, 19 facets on the pavilion, and a polished girdle. Trilliant Shape Diamonds are definitely for the adventurous.
Cushion Cut Diamond
Cushion Cut Diamond
Also known as Pillow Cut. This particular Shape is one of the most popular ways to cut diamonds ever. Beginning from 1830 to 1900 diamonds were cut into this shape. Largest diamond in the world Golden Jubilee -545.67 ct. is shaped as Cushion Diamond. Until recently the diamonds of this shape were hard to come by but recently Cushion Cut Diamonds are showing back in the stores. This is definitely a very romantic cut that has an antique look to it.
Asscher Shaped Diamond
Asscher Shaped Diamond
Asscher unique shape is almost identical to the emerald-cut, except that it is square. Furthermore Asscher shape has a pavilion hat is cut with rectangular facets in the same style as the emerald-cut. Developed by Asscher Brothers of Holland It is a stepped square cut, often called the "square emerald cut" and like an, the Asscher has cropped corners. Asscher Cut Diamond was featured in the famous television show "Sex and The City" which boosted its popularity and in turn triggered its availability

DIAMOND SHAPES

 

ROUND BRILLIANT DIAMOND 

This shape has set the standard for all other diamond shapes, and accounts for more than 75% of diamonds sold today. Its 58-facet cut, divided among its crown (top), girdle (widest part) and pavilion (base), is calibrated through a precise formula to achieve the maximum in fire and brilliance.

 

PEAR SHAPED DIAMOND

A hybrid cut, combining the best of the oval and the marquise, it is shaped most like a sparkling teardrop. It also belongs to that category of diamond whose design most complements a hand with small or average-length fingers. It is particularly beautiful for pendants or earrings.

 

HEART SHAPED DIAMOND

This ultimate symbol of romance is essentially a pear-shaped diamond with a cleft at the top. The skill of the cutter determines the beauty of the cut. Look for a stone with an even shape and a well-defined outline.

 

EMERALD CUT DIAMOND

This is a rectangular shape with cut corners. It is known as a step cut because its concentric broad, flat planes resemble stair steps. Since inclusions and inferior color are more pronounced in this particular cut, take pains to select a stone of superior clarity and color.

 

PRINCESS CUT DIAMOND

This is a square or rectangular cut with numerous sparkling facets. It is a relatively new cut and often finds its way into solitaire engagement rings. It is often embellished with triangular stones at its sides. Because of its design, this cut requires more weight to be directed toward the diamond’s depth in order to maximize brilliance. Depth percentages of 70% to 78% are not uncommon.

 

OVAL DIAMOND

An even, perfectly symmetrical design popular among women with small hands. Its elongated shape gives a flattering illusion of length to the hand.

 

MARQUISE DIAMOND

An elongated shape with pointed ends inspired by the fetching smile of the Marquise de Pompadour and commissioned by the Sun King, France’s Louis XIV, who wanted a diamond to match it. It is gorgeous when used as a solitaire or when enhanced by smaller diamonds.

 

RADIANT DIAMOND 

This square or rectangular cut combines the elegance of the emerald shape diamond with the brilliance of the round, and its 70 facets maximize the effect of its color refraction. Because of its design, this cut requires more weight to be directed toward the diamond’s depth in order to maximize brilliance. Depth percentages of 70% to 78% are not uncommon.

 

ASSCHER CUT DIAMOND 

Similar in appearance to the emerald cut, the Asscher cut is differentiated by a more square shape and the presence of a pavilion with rectangular facets. It is also charecherterised by its distinctive rounded corners. Developed by the Asscher Brothers of Holland in 1902, this cut is very eye catching, the asscher diamond draws the eye to the diamond. It is recommended that when considering these diamonds, emphasis should also be placed on a diamond with a good clarity grade. A good length to width ratio for these diamonds would be between 1 and 1.05.

 

CUSHION CUT DIAMOND

An antique style of cut that looks like a cross between an Old Mine Cut (a deep cut with large facets that was common in the late 19th and the early 20th centuries) and a modern oval cut.

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The Geohavens name is an assurance of timeless beauty, distinct quality and uncompromising value. The Company spares no effort in sourcing from the farthest markets and the deepest mines in order to unearth the most attractive gems.

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